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Welcome to Kanha Earth Lodge

Kanha Earth Lodge lies in 16 acres of natural forest, tucked away in a small hamlet bordering Kanha’s buffer zone. Its unique location, 30 minutes from the Khatia/Kisli park gate, ensures that it is close enough for easy access to the park, but still far enough from the glut of hotels lining Kanha’s tourist hub to offer guests a true wilderness experience. Our guests benefit from our incredible location, outstanding hospitality, experienced team of naturalists, and commitment towards conservation and local communities. The 12 luxury bungalows with en suite bathrooms and open verandahs have been inspired by Gond tribal architecture and offer environmentally sensitive, low-impact accommodation through their design and use of local stone and waste wood, while the absence of neighbouring lodges or highways creates an ideal setting for nature walks, birding and cycling trips through the surrounding forest.

About Kanha

Kanha Tiger Reserve is spread over an area of 1,949 sq km (940 sq km of core area and 1,009 sq km of buffer zone), making it one of the best tiger habitats in India. Situated in the Central Indian Highlands that are part of peninsular India’s vast tableland, the region was once covered in continuous forests that accounted for a significant part of the country’s wild habitats. Today, the Highlands are fragmented in parks such as Panna, Bandhavgarh, Kanha, Pench and Sanjay. Kanha’s hills and dense groves of vegetation constitute Sal, Bamboo, Tendu, Jamun, Arjun and Lendia. The reserve’s lifeline, however, are its grassy meadows that sustain large numbers of Chital, Sambar, Barasingha and Gaur, which in turn support its predators (tigers, leopards, wild dogs, jungle cats and foxes). Kanha’s greatest achievement has been the preservation of Hard Ground Swamp Deer (or Barasingha) from near extinction (they numbered just 66 in 1970). Today, they number more than 400 and are the only surviving population of Barasingha in the wild.